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Janie Thompson is the immediate past President of the Continence Nurses Society Australia and has over 20 years experience as a Nurse Continence Specialist. She works for Alfred Health Continence Service in Melbourne.
Physiotherapist Stephanie Boadle intended to return to Melbourne after a four-month rotation in Alice Springs in September 2017, but she loved it so much she has decided to stay.
Following escalating media stories, the Australian Government announced a Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety in September 2018. We interviewed Minister for Senior Australians and Aged Care, the Hon. Ken Wyatt AM MP, to find out more about the Royal Commission.
An online continence pocket guide for the growing disability and aged care workforce is now
World Toilet Day is a stark reminder that 4.5 billion people still live without a safe toilet, including school kids in Australia.
Former nurse and foster carer, Susanna Harrison of Far North Queensland has been named the Continence Foundation’s 2018 Carer of the Year.
National Continence Helpline Manager, SUE BLINMAN, answers some frequently asked continence questions:
A new website to help up to 60,000 Australian teenagers with bladder and bowel problems, was launched today at the National Conference on Incontinence.
The 2017-2018 financial year saw 27,623 calls for help to the National Continence Helpline. We’ve gathered the statistics on caller satisfaction, referrals and caller type.
Incontinence has a profound effect on the mental health of over five million Australians who are today living with bladder and bowel control problems.
Brisbane-born model Anja Christoffersen was only 17 when she first walked in Amsterdam Fashion Week. Three years later, she’s also focusing on another kind of modelling—being a role model for young people with chronic bladder and bowel conditions. Anja was born with VACTERL Association, a disorder that affects many body systems. While she’s been incontinent her entire life, she hasn’t let it get in the way of pursing her dreams. Anja speaks to Kasia Kosidlo about her challenges and ambition to help others.
Ever wondered if your doctor or health specialist truly understands the debilitating effect incontinence has on your life? Associate Professor Michael Murray does. We spoke with him about his own compelling, very personal post-surgery story.
The South Australian council of Gawler, in the Barossa Valley, is leading the way for local government by installing continence pad disposal bins in their men’s public toilets.
The Continence Carer of the Year Award acknowledges the important but often overlooked role of at-home carers, who deal with the complex role of caring for someone with incontinence. The award is open to carers from all around Australia, and nominations are invited from family, friends or health professionals who would like to bring to our attention these amazing individuals whose contributions are valued at over $1 billion a week in Australia. The winner of the Continence Carer of the Year Award receives a prize of $1000.
This year, we launched a major public awareness campaign in March, Laugh Without Leaking. It featured comedian Bev Killick, who has lived with incontinence her entire life. And in June, we headed to Canberra to officially launch World Continence Week (WCW) at Parliament House with Health Minister Greg Hunt and Aged Care and Indigenous Health Minister, Ken Wyatt.
July 8 marks the start of NAIDOC week, a national week of celebration of the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
National Continence Helpline Manager SUE BLINMAN answers some frequently asked continence questions:
World Continence Week 18 to 24 June 2018 - Over 5 million adult Australians are suffering in silence from a $67 billion health issue that for the majority can be helped or even cured.
Greg Ryan was born without an anal opening, a congenital abnormality known as Imperforate Anus which affects 30,000 babies around the world each year. Without surgical intervention at birth, Greg would have died within 24 hours. Two Australian surgeons saved him, but the outcome ushered him into a life of shame, secrecy, social stigma and intense mental health difficulties.
Anne-Marie Howarth was 31 years old when she suffered a motorbike accident which left her with a spinal cord injury, restricting her bladder and bowel control. Not to be outdone by her injury, instead it opened a world of new opportunities.
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Last Updated: Thu 12, Aug 2021
Last Reviewed: Tue 17, Mar 2020