News

Men’s Health Week (10-16 June) is an opportunity for men to take that first step toward regaining control of their bladder and bowel.
National Continence Helpline Manager, Sue Blinman, answers some frequently asked continence questions.
Towards the end of 2015, Stephen noticed dark blood in his semen. This symptom continued for a couple of months before he went to see a health professional. After further tests and biopsies, Stephen was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2018.

Few people relish the thought of discussing their toilet habits with a GP. You should never feel embarrassed about discussing incontinence with a doctor. They are professionally-trained to relate to such matters.

Doctors are accustomed to dealing with issues of an intimate nature, including bladder and bowel problems. Do not let nerves stop you from taking the first step. The first time you discuss it is the hardest. But the more you talk about it, the easier it will become.

For pharmacists and pharmacy assistants, addressing continence issues can be challenging. In this article we cover some common issues that your customers might be experiencing and the best ways to address them.

Who might be at risk of developing continence issues?

Many people may develop continence issues but the key at risk groups include:

Beth Wilson

Beth became Patron of the Continence Foundation of Australia in 2013 with the aim of helping lift the stigma associated with talking about, and seeking help for, this debilitating condition. She is keen to open the floodgates of conversation about incontinence and bowel and bladder health.

In the midst of World Continence Week, Jean Hailes for Women’s Health has announced the Continence Foundation of Australia as a Community Partner for Women’s Health Week, 2-6 September 2019.
Continence Foundation member Dr Marg Sherburn shares with ABC Radio listeners how to do pelvic floor exercises to improve bladder and bowel control.
The short answer is yes, the terms ‘kegels’ and ‘pelvic floor muscle exercises’ (PFME) refer to the same actions and are often used interchangeably.
Wondering why body weight is often mentioned in information around incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse? The relationship is more significant than you may think.
The Australian Government’s newly-released National Women’s Health Strategy 2020-2030 identifies incontinence as a key health risk for women and girls.
Adolescence can be awkward, complicated and sometimes confusing, so imagine adding bladder and bowel problems into the mix. 20 year old Brisbane-based model Anja Christoffersen has a message for young people who experience incontinence.
Each year, the National Continence Helpline conducts a survey with consumers, carers and health professionals to better understand how we can improve our service.
National Continence Helpline Manager, Sue Blinman, answers some frequently asked continence questions.
Patricia Neumann is a specialist continence and women’s health physiotherapist and a Fellow of the Australian College of Physiotherapists. She works as a clinician at Flex Rehabilitation Clinic in Adelaide and has a clinical interest in all types of pelvic floor dysfunction in men and women, including pelvic pain.
When you think of injuries from working out, the pelvic organs and floor muscles might not be at the top of your list. But in fact, the pelvic floor is like any other muscle and can be placed under strain.
A Continence Community Health Promotion Grant gave Beanstalk Child Psychology in Adelaide the chance to provide a free toilet training workshop.
The Continence Aids Payment Scheme (CAPS) is an Australian Government scheme that assists eligible people to meet some of the cost of their continence products.
Learn about your pelvic floor muscles - help prevent leaks and improve sexual fitness
Thanks to all who entered the Continence Support Now survey and provided feedback. Congratulations to Deanne Scriven of South Australia on winning the Apple iPad prize draw.
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Last Updated: Tue 19, Apr 2022
Last Reviewed: Tue 17, Mar 2020