The most important thing to do when going on holiday is to plan ahead. This will make your travel experience run as smoothly as possible and give you peace of mind. Read on for some tips to help you manage bladder and bowel concerns.
Audrey Burgin has more than 45 years’ experience as a community nurse, and 15 years’ experience as a continence nurse specialist focused on community and aged care in Queensland. Audrey has a keen interest in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health promotion and is currently employed as a clinical nurse, caring for patients attending an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care Clinic in Brisbane.
Resist the temptation of Dr Google with the help of our expert, Continence and Pelvic Floor Physiotherapist Annabelle Citroen.
Food and dietary choices seem a world away from pelvic health, but there’s a closer link than you think.
Continence Foundation member Dr Marg Sherburn shares with ABC Radio listeners how to do pelvic floor exercises to improve bladder and bowel control.
Wondering why body weight is often mentioned in information around incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse? The relationship is more significant than you may think.
The short answer is yes, the terms ‘kegels’ and ‘pelvic floor muscle exercises’ (PFME) refer to the same actions and are often used interchangeably.
When you think of injuries from working out, the pelvic organs and floor muscles might not be at the top of your list. But in fact, the pelvic floor is like any other muscle and can be placed under strain.
Rebounding exercise is performed on a rebounder or mini trampoline. Learn more about the health benefits, how safe it is for your pelvic floor and ways to modify rebounding exercises for people with pelvic floor problems.
A hypertonic pelvic floor occurs when the muscles in the pelvic floor become too tense and are unable to relax. Discover in this article what it is, what causes a hypertonic pelvic floor, the signs & symptoms, and what to do if you or your client has the condition.