News

Brisbane-born model Anja Christoffersen was only 17 when she first walked in Amsterdam Fashion Week. Three years later, she’s also focusing on another kind of modelling—being a role model for young people with chronic bladder and bowel conditions. Anja was born with VACTERL Association, a disorder that affects many body systems. While she’s been incontinent her entire life, she hasn’t let it get in the way of pursing her dreams. Anja speaks to Kasia Kosidlo about her challenges and ambition to help others.
Ever wondered if your doctor or health specialist truly understands the debilitating effect incontinence has on your life? Associate Professor Michael Murray does. We spoke with him about his own compelling, very personal post-surgery story.
The South Australian council of Gawler, in the Barossa Valley, is leading the way for local government by installing continence pad disposal bins in their men’s public toilets.
The Continence Carer of the Year Award acknowledges the important but often overlooked role of at-home carers, who deal with the complex role of caring for someone with incontinence. The award is open to carers from all around Australia, and nominations are invited from family, friends or health professionals who would like to bring to our attention these amazing individuals whose contributions are valued at over $1 billion a week in Australia. The winner of the Continence Carer of the Year Award receives a prize of $1000.
This year, we launched a major public awareness campaign in March, Laugh Without Leaking. It featured comedian Bev Killick, who has lived with incontinence her entire life. And in June, we headed to Canberra to officially launch World Continence Week (WCW) at Parliament House with Health Minister Greg Hunt and Aged Care and Indigenous Health Minister, Ken Wyatt.
July 8 marks the start of NAIDOC week, a national week of celebration of the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
National Continence Helpline Manager SUE BLINMAN answers some frequently asked continence questions:
World Continence Week 18 to 24 June 2018 - Over 5 million adult Australians are suffering in silence from a $67 billion health issue that for the majority can be helped or even cured.
Anne-Marie Howarth was 31 years old when she suffered a motorbike accident which left her with a spinal cord injury, restricting her bladder and bowel control. Not to be outdone by her injury, instead it opened a world of new opportunities.
Greg Ryan was born without an anal opening, a congenital abnormality known as Imperforate Anus which affects 30,000 babies around the world each year. Without surgical intervention at birth, Greg would have died within 24 hours. Two Australian surgeons saved him, but the outcome ushered him into a life of shame, secrecy, social stigma and intense mental health difficulties.
Irmina is Assistant Professor, Clinical Education Coordination at the University of Canberra and works as a pelvic floor physiotherapist in private practice.
Elite netballer, Sharelle McMahon remembers the day well. She was at a training session with the ANZ Championship team, the Melbourne Vixens when a physiotherapist used an external ultrasound to track how well the players were switching on their pelvic floor. “Only one of us in that group was actually activating our pelvic floor correctly, and that one wasn’t me,” said Sharelle.
The Continence Foundation of Australia is featuring the latest in research and practice at the 27th annual National Conference on Incontinence. This year, it will also feature a forum for people living with bladder and bowel issues, their carers, family and friends.
In this issue, we are honoured to share the challenges overcome by a Canadian kid - bullied at school due to faecal incontinence, we speak with former Australian Netball Captain, Sharelle McMahon about her pelvic floor challenges both on and off the court and we introduce you to our new Laugh Without Leaking campaign.
The search is on for the best belly-laugh-provoking toilet humour across Australia - from Darwin to Hobart and everywhere in between.
A new campaign launched today by the Continence Foundation of Australia reveals that the majority of bladder and bowel troubles can be helped or even cured.
5-11 March is Kidney Health Week, the perfect time to remind everyone that drinking too much water is one of the three common ways women sabotage their pelvic floor.
We invite abstract submissions from those wishing to share their research and innovative practice.
The Continence Foundation of Australia is excited to announce a limited number of fully-funded scholarships are available for an upcoming online course for health professionals wanting to increase their knowledge of paediatric continence.
We asked children's continence nurse and National Continence Helpline consultant Janine Armocida what parents and children can expect in a continence assessment.
100

Last Updated: Sun 17, May 2020
Last Reviewed: Mon 30, Mar 2020